The Cleveland Indians had a comeback for the ages in Game 2, defeating the New York Yankees after trailing 8-3 in the sixth inning.

For as much attention as the Houston Astros have gotten through their first two games, the Cleveland Indians are asserting themselves as the best team in the American League. After they shut down the New York Yankees’ high-powered offense in Game 1, they won Game 2 in thrilling comeback fashion.

Although the Yankees are an underdog, they are a live one, and through five innings, they showed why they could possibly take this series. They built themselves an 8-3 lead thanks to homers from Gary Sanchez, Aaron Hicks, and Greg Bird. Once Edwin Encarnacion left the game for the Indians, it seemed over for them.

But when they needed a spark, they got one from Francisco Lindor, who hit a clutch grand slam in the sixth inning to pull the Tribe to within 1:

The Indians are a team that’s built on depth, and while nobody truly stands out for them on offense, Lindor has established himself as their most important player. He proved why with this slam.

They finally tied it in the eighth inning with a solo shot from Jay Bruce.

This postseason could not have gone any worse for David Robertson — after one of his pitches got foul-tipped into Sanchez’s groin, he gave up the tying run in a pivotal Game 2.

Once the game went into extra innings, the fans were treated to a fantastic pitchers duel between Josh Tomlin and Dellin Betances. Tomlin went two innings strong without allowing a hit and striking out three.

Betances was excellent too, but he started the 13th inning by walking Austin Jackson. Once he stole second, Joe Girardi should’ve pulled him from the game. Instead, he kept him in and gave up the walk-off single to Yan Gomes:

Everyone may have been happy to see the Cubs win last year, but the Indians are still pissed off that they blew a 3-1 lead. Now that they have the current longest championship drought in professional sports, they’re on a mission to end it now.





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