After hitting his first MLB home run, Max Scherzer had to leave the game wtih an apparent neck injury.

After Adam Wainwright injured his Achilles in 2015 while running out a ball, Washington Nationals right-hander and ace Max Scherzer touched off a little tiff by boldly proclaiming that no one really wanted to watch pitchers up there “swinging a wet noodle.” For the most part, Scherzer does swing a wet noodle every time he goes to the plate. He was just a .188/.223/.203 hitter entering the Nats game on Tuesday night against the Miami Marlins.

Scherzer had always shown a knack for helping himself with men in scoring position — he did drive in 12 last year — but had never hit a home run in the big leagues and only had four doubles.

In the top of the second, with men on the corners, Scherzer was attempting to bunt against left-hander Chris O’Grady. With two strikes, Scherzer was still showing bunt, which may have prompted O’Grady to throw a get-me-over curve. From there, it was up to the wet noodle to do its thing.

After rounding the bases and getting the customary silent treatment reserved for a player’s first MLB home run, Scherzer was preparing to go back out for the bottom of the second. MASN cameras caught him grimacing in the dugout.

Scherzer attempted to work through the apparent neck spasms and went out to warm up for the next inning. He had to be removed after only one warmup toss. Scherzer was relieved by left-hander Matt Grace.

Talk about irony, huh? Scherzer wanted the bat taken out of pitchers’ hands over injury concerns and lack of hitting ability. Then, he goes out and crushes an upper-deck shot and injures himself in the process. The big swing and the neck spasms may not be related, but pitchers are always at the mercy of their bodies when they swing a few times a week.

Hopefully this is just a minor setback for Scherzer, who is 12-5 on the year and has a shot at a 300-strikeout season. While I do enjoy #pitcherswhorake, I would much rather watch Max Scherzer strike batters out. The Washington Nationals concur.



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